Jim Buscher

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Returning Home

Day 10
 
Today was my last day in Quito. Since there were only 4 of us that were going to be in Quito all day, I decided to sleep in. After waking up and eating breakfast, Mike and I met Jacob and Derrick at the TeleferiQo. I did not go up it a second time. After Jacob and Derrick returned from the top, the four of us went back to Historic Quito. We walked up and down the old streets but had two locations in mind.
 
The first location was the Iglesia de la Compania de Jesus. This place was also called the Gold Church. Inside was amazing. There was gold and paintings everywhere. One painting in particular was one that depicted hell organized by the sin of the person there. I'm glad that I had the chance to see this miraculous building. Another church we visited was the old Basilica. Here the four of us were able to climb the towers and get a great view of the city.
 
A trip to South America would not be complete without watching a soccer game with the locals. Luckily, tonight, Liga de Quito was playing Barcelona (not from Spain but Guayaquil). Jacob, Derrick, myself, and two translators from our group went to a local coffee shop for dinner and to watch the game. It was a blast being able to watch such an important league game in a different atmosphere.
 
 
Finally Home

 
My flight left yesterday, from Quito, at 11:25 PM. After about 12 hours of traveling I managed to make it home safely. I have had such a great time on this trip. I gained everything I had hoped through this experience. Seeing the appreciation on the Ecuadorian's faces made all the cold showers and rice dinners worth it. If my schedule allows me to return I most certainly will. I have seen medical techniques that were not accomplished in a state of the art hospital, I have also seen a culture that can not be appreciated from a book, I have made friends that I hope will last forever, and most importantly, I have performed a service that is appreciated by every person who came to the clinic and anyone who hears about the clinic. 
 
If anyone has any questions about my trip or Shoulder to Shoulder, please feel free to contact me at james.buscher@uky.edu.

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 
Jim Buscher

Sightseeing in Quito

Day 9 

 
I am glad that I took the early bus to Quito. The brigade was finished with our clinical duties and it was time to do the touristy events. First, the group went to the equator. It would seem stupid not to go to the equator while in Ecuador. There was a huge monument and a lot of shops. It was definitely meant for tourists. I got my picture on the line but later found out that the equator we went to was not the real equator. Oh well, I had fun there anyway.  

 
After traveling to the equator in the Ciudad del Mundo the group went to the TeleferiQo on the north side of Quito. The TeleferiQo is a lift system that takes people up to an elevation of 4100 m (about 2.5 miles). This elevation gives a beautiful view of the city and also one of the volcano, Pichincha. I was surprised to see that the tickets for the ferry were $6.50 and $8.50 for adults who were foreigners.  

 
After the TeleferiQo my bus met up with the others in the brigade who left later. The two buses met at an old church. Here we were again divided into two groups and led on a tour by two characters. One was an old lady, in black, while the other was led by the Devil. We saw multiple rooms of the church and of various parts of history. We saw the painting of the Ecuadorian Last Supper. I don't know if that was the real name, but the people were eating Cuy (guinea pig), drinking a local liquor, and eating products made of corn. We heard of priests who escaped the convent night after night to see women. We learned of how the priests lived and how they performed flagellation. After the church we saw the Plaza Grande and the plaza and church of San Francisco. It was nice having a tour guide to take us through Historic Quito. 
 

We ended the evening by finally checking into our hotel. The rooms are very nice. We have warm water, nice beds, and fluffy pillows. I will definitely sleep well tonight. Many in the brigade left tonight for home. A few others and myself are remaining in Quito another day. It was sad to not be able to spend another day with them, but I'm sure they are ready to get home to their own beds and loved ones.

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 

A Day of Fun in Mindo

Day 8

The bus ride through the country side to Mindo, from Santo Domingo, lasted about two and a half hours. The mountainous terrain makes for a very enjoyable ride. Clouds are always at the mountain tops and occasionally one can see a snow capped mountain in the distance. In Mindo, the group stayed in a hostel. It reminded me more of camping than staying in a hotel. It was great to have a warm shower. My room didn't get hot water but at least it wasn't freezing cold.  
 

While in Mindo the group was given many options for activities. One choice was to go hiking and another was to see the butterfly gardens. I chose another option, zip lining. This is an activity I would recommend everyone try if they get the chance. I hate heights but I loved flying down the zip line being able to see the forest and the city of Mindo. We were even given the option of doing tricks. One trick was "superman" were a guide goes down the line with the person and allow them to slide face first. The trick I did was called "mariposa" or "butterfly." This trick consisted of a guide and myself with me going down the zip line upside down. It was definitely a new experience. 
 

Mindo is a small city and tonight, they had a festival to honor the city. Mindo has been around for 149 years. This time seemed shorter than I thought it would have been but I asked the the translator and they said I had the number correct. There were vendors and music playing that could be heard throughout the entire community. There was also a singing contest. While there we met a man who seemed to have a large role in the festivities for the evening. When talking to him he thought it was great how Shoulder to Shoulder was providing health care for people in Ecuador. He gave us a shout out in front of the entire crowd. He also wanted us to take part in the festivities. Three other guys and myself ended up singing for the whole crowd at the festival. Only one of us spoke fluent Spanish so we only had a limited number of songs we could sing. We chose La Bamba. It was a blast. I thought we were going to make fools of ourselves but after watching a recording and talking to other people there, we were entertaining. 
 

I have chosen to go on the earlier bus tomorrow for Quito. The group has more touristy things to do and I can't wait. Every day of this trip has seemed to get better and better.
 

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 

Work and Play

Day 7

 

It was amazing how much better the clinic looked after the work of the day had been completed. While some were at the nutrition center, I was with many others from our group at the clinic. We sanded down the walls of the building and the metal fence and then repainted it. The shelter was also cleaned and painted with varnish. It was great to see how much better the Hombro a Hombro (Shoulder to Shoulder) clinic looked with just a few hours of work by the brigade. After the community work, we were supposed to play a soccer game but sadly, the plans fell through.
 

However, today was not all work, there was also a lot of play. The brigade traveled to down town Santo Domingo and ate a celebratory dinner at a very nice restaurant. Simple chicken and rice was not on the menu tonight. We were served fish, beef fillet, a vegetable salad, and rice. For desert we had a peach half. The food was amazing. It was nice to have a full meal that wasn't made complete by needing a second serving of white rice.
 

Dinner wasn't the end of the festivities. The whole group traveled to a bar for dancing and karaoke. I have learned that no matter how much our translator tries to teach me to dance by using only my hips, it just doesn't work for me. It was great seeing the group members of all ages dancing at the discotheque and singing karaoke. Tonight was a great night. Since we have completed our clinic work, the brigade will be traveling to the town of Mindo for more exciting cultural activities.
 

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 
Jim Buscher

Day 6: Visiting Tsachila

Day 6
 

Today I was blessed by a Tsachilan shaman. This was the indigenous people's way of thanking Shoulder to Shoulder for coming and providing health care for the people. We were told that we took care of the people physically and the people of Tsachila were going to take care of us spiritually. Since I was at the clinic yesterday, it was my group's turn to go to Tsachila. It was an interesting day to say the least. 
 

Javier is our bus driver and he is one of the best drivers I have ever seen. He has been able to make hairpin turns and compete with the aggressive Ecuadorian traffic. Today, I thought I met Javier's match: mud. As we progressed through the forest our bus came upon a muddy patch in the road. Slowly, the bus began to slide until the tire dug itself into the ground. We were stuck in the middle of the forest. Javier worked quickly to dig and place traction behind the tires. Eventually, with the group pushing and Javier's work, the bus came loose and we were again on our journey to Tsachila. The clinic went as normal but it was the festivities after that were the highlight of the day.
 

After completing our clinical duties we traveled to the home of the president of the Tsachila community. The Shaman blessed us and we were taught how the people paint their hair with the seeds of a certain fruit. In Tsachila myth, the seeds helped protect them from evil. We were also painted with the juice of a fruit that goes on clear but eventually turns to a dark blue color. This is like a henna tattoo and should wear off in about two weeks. After the painting, music was played for us and the group danced within the hut.
 

Our evening ended as usual by hanging out in the convent and looking forward to what tomorrow will bring. I am excited about tomorrow because we will be working on a community service project. Some of us will be performing clinical work and staffing a center for nutrition while others will be helping to better the clinic. 
 

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 

Working through the problems

Day 5

The group was split in two today. Some went to the Tsachila village while I went to the Shoulder to Shoulder clinic. I was excited to finally be able to see the clinic that I have heard about for the past few months. The clinic wasn't in the best part of town but there was a guard watching the gate and only let in a few people in at a time. We had our own set of problems but a solution was always found. When our hemoglobin strips stopped working properly we had to use a centrifuge to determine the hematocrit levels. It was different seeing how tests could be run without current technology.

The clinic went well and I was able to meet many people. The clinic staff kept order and ensured all patients were treated. The only issue of the day was when a mother came running into the clinic with her baby who was having a seizure. They didn't have the proper medication to stop the seizure but the doctors were able to stabilize the child and send him to the local hospital. Each staff member reacted quickly and it was almost like watching a choreographed show. The nurses insured the frantic parents to remain outside while the doctors worked within the walls of the clinic. 

 

Again we came home to a very simple seafood and rice dish at the convent. I am looking forward to being able to visit the native village of Tsachila.  

 

I´m sorry I cannot write more but I am using the clinic computer and have to let the others in the group send their emails. They are definitely keeping us busy, but I am having a great time. I can´t wait to find out what the next few days will bring.

_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Inline Images: 
College of Arts & Sciences Guest Blogger, Jim Buscher

Day 4: Travel to a Convent

Day 4

I have left the city of Cotacachi and have traveled further east.  The brigade left at 8 this morning after our normal breakfast of bread and fruit. We spent most of the day on the bus.  It is interesting how much the terrain changes as we descend down the mountain.  I saw the land begin to dry into almost dessert with aloe plants and few grasses into a lush rain forest filled with many plants and water falls.  Although the distance was not that great, the bus trip ended up taking us about 6 hours.  On the bright side we were able to get a taste of home when we arrived at Santo Domingo; pizza.  
 
Our hotel accommodations have changed since Rancho Santa Fe.  The brigade is housed in a convent with nuns and a father.  As I was warned prior, there is no warm water and the nuns actually turn off our water every night.  Dinner was very simple.  The nuns prepared us very simple dinner consisting of rice and boiled chicken.  It is different staying in a convent as opposed to a hotel. 
_____________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 
Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

 
Follow Jim's adventure in Ecuador through this blog. To learn more about Shoulder to Shoulder visit: http://www.shouldertoshoulderky.org/.
 

Inline Images: 

Day 3: A makeshift clinic in a small village

Day 3

Today was amazing.  It was work, but well worth it.  I was able to experience my first Shoulder to Shoulder experience in a makeshift clinic in a local community called Tunibamba.  The clinic wasn’t the tradition clinic held in the states; this clinic was constructed at a school.  Each building seemed to house a different team of workers specializing in certain tasks.  I was stationed with the screening team and shared a room with an Ecuadorian organization called, “Vista Para Todos” or vision for all.  

For screening, my group’s task was to take blood pressure, glucose readings, hemoglobin, height, and weight.  We started with two automatic blood pressure machines, however, one stopped working and I had to start taking blood pressures manually when there was more than one person waiting to be seen. 

People of all ages and sizes came to the clinic. It is surprising how young the people in the communities look. There are some people that I would say are in there teens when I found out that they are over 40.  Although the looks can be deceiving, so can the language barrier.  Apparently, the people of Tunibamba speak a specific dialect and most of the older ones do not speak Spanish. Some cases required our translator from the Peace Corps and a second translator from the community. 

Being one of the earlier stations my group finished before most of the others.  This allowed me to observe other specialties in action.  I had never seen a tooth be extracted, but today I got my chance.  In fact, 38 teeth had to be extracted today from people of all ages.  At the end of the clinic, many in the community had been helped.  Some received medications for their pain while others were taught how to stretch and exercises to ease their aches.  Children received toothbrushes and learned proper brushing techniques.  Young and old walked around wearing soccer gear that my friend Jacob brought.  Helping the people was gratifying enough, however, corn, potatoes, and queso fresca was made as a gift.  Our translator told us it would be rude not to eat the food, as this was all the community could offer to us as thanks for our efforts. 

Today was not completely filled with work.  My roommates and I quickly learned that being near the equator doesn’t always mean that the pool is warm.  With swimming out of the question, members of the brigade turned to a field we found with small soccer goals.  We started playing Frisbee but switched quickly, to soccer.  People who had never watched soccer, yet alone played, were taking part in the activities.  My team lost but it was still fun.

Tomorrow is going to be a completely new experience.  In the morning, the brigade is leaving for Santo Domingo de los Colorados.  After a 5-hour bus ride the group will arrive at a convent that is to act as our housing for the next few days.  I am told there will be no more warm showers and internet will be scarce.  At least there will be a field where another game of pick-up soccer can be played.  
________________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 
 

Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

 
Follow Jim's adventure in Ecuador through this blog. To learn more about Shoulder to Shoulder visit: http://www.shouldertoshoulderky.org/.
 

Inline Images: 
Jim Buscher

Settling In

Day 2

Between arriving around 2:30 a.m. to the Rancho Santa Fe and breakfast at 8:00 a.m. I only received four hours of sleep. It doesn’t bother me because I am too excited to be tired. Today was an exciting day as the group leader had many activities planned.

Breakfast was very simple. It consisted of some bread, some fresh papayas, and some plantains. One item I had never tried before was tree tomato juice. It was a nice substitute for the orange juice back home. 

After breakfast the group left for the town of Otavalo. Here, we all visited the market. We were encouraged by our guide to be careful of pickpockets and to have fun. This market was like most outdoor markets I have seen. Vendors were set up for rows and rows. I was able to haggle a few items for myself and for others. I can’t tell you what those items were for the sake of maintaining the secrecy of my gifts. The market had everything from cheap trinkets to raw meat. There was even a fruit and vegetable section that sold oranges at 25 for a dollar. There are some items that are averagely priced for me, but I quickly learned that when buying bottled water I could get five liters (more than a gallon) for only $1.20. 

The day did not stop at the market. Around noon the group returned to the hotel for our first true meal. It was delicious. I had soup, steak and fries, and even a fig and cheese dessert. I never expected three courses for lunch. I was also introduced to a sauce called, “Ahi.”  This sauce is used to spice up the meal. I especially enjoyed it on my rice.
 
Immediately after lunch, the brigade was transported to a lake that formed from a volcano. This lake was made from a caldera that created a crater and filled with water. While at the lake I was able to drink a cinnamon tea. I can’t remember what it was called, but it was excellent. The group was able to shop more one the trip home but upon returning to the Santa Fe, I was given another three course meal.

Today was a day of fun, but it ended with business. Following dinner was the time set aside to prepare for our first day of clinic. As a group we played a fun game enabling me, and others, to remember everyone’s name. The brigade was divided into groups. I was assigned to the screening group. I will learn more about my tasks tomorrow but I will be taking glucose readings, blood pressure, and other vital readings.
 
The other groups consisted of the physical therapy team, dentistry, medical, interpreters (which consisted of members and Peace Corps members), and pharmacy.

Tomorrow will be an exciting day. We will be providing health care for indigenous people. Some of these people have never seen a dentist or a doctor. I can’t wait to see what I will experience tomorrow. Today was eventful and now it is time to prepare for the business of tomorrow. 
-------------------------------------------
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010). But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 

Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health. The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.
 

Follow Jim's adventure in Ecuador through this blog. To learn more about Shoulder to Shoulder visit: http://www.shouldertoshoulderky.org/.

Inline Images: 
Jim Buscher, Guest Blogger for the College of Arts & Sciences

A Journey to Ecuador

Day 1

I wasn’t sure what to expect from Ecuador.  I have traveled to Japan, Bahamas, and even St. Lucia but I have never had the privilege of traveling to South America.  Although I had to overcome the normal difficulties of TSA confiscating my friend’s toothpaste and bug spray, or the annoyances of the self check-in kiosks I was eventually able to gaze on the lights of Ecuador’s capitol city of Quito.  From the air, the city seemed larger than I was anticipating.  Although I was tired from the full day of traveling (I arrived at the Cincinnati airport around noon and landed in Quito around 10:30 PM central time) I was ecstatic about my entrance into a culture I had never experienced. 

I went through customs but was quickly told that the hotel we were staying at for the first few days was a two-hour drive by bus.  A two-hour drive normally would not be bad, none-the-less, by the time my brigade members had congregated after customs and all the luggage was loaded onto the bus it was after midnight.  At least during the drive I was able to see the city at night. There were very few people on the streets and all the businesses appeared to be locked up.  I hadn’t had the opportunity to see Quito in the daylight, but I will get the chance to return near the conclusion of my trip. 

The bus took us to a city called Cotacatchi.  We are staying at a nice, ranch style lodge called Rancho Santa Fe.  Luckily, we have warm water and nice beds to sleep on.  Friends I have met tell me I should enjoy these amenities while they last.  In a few days the team will be leaving for locations where flushing toilets may not be an option.   The hotel supplies my two roommates and I bottled water.  We will use this to brush our teeth in order to reduce our risk of becoming ill.  Although it is a bit of a change to brush my teeth with bottled water, it is an even bigger change in how one cleans after going to the bathroom.  Apparently, the Ecuadorian sewage cannot handle toilet paper in the pipes.  With this in mind, a small waste paper basket sits beside the toilet to act as a receptacle for soiled toilet paper. 

Hopefully, my Spanish will return to allow me to function well while here.  Luckily our group has translators incase this does not happen for me.   I look forward to what tomorrow will bring for the group and me.  We are scheduled for breakfast and then cultural experiences. 
______________________
Jim Buscher, who will start at UK Medical School in August, is a two-time graduate of the College of Arts & Sciences with degrees in psychology (2009) and biology (2010).  But before he enrolls in gross anatomy or makes his rotations in the hospital, Buscher has embarked on a journey to Ecuador as a volunteer with Shoulder to Shoulder Kentucky, an international organization dedicated to improving the quality of life in resource-limited communities. 

Jim will spend time working in health clinics performing screenings and tackling the issues that confront the community’s wellbeing, but he also plans on doing more than dealing with health initiatives. Following the lead of Jacob Sither, a friend and student in UK’s College of Public Health, Jim will take part in distributing donated equipment to help develop a soccer program in the community, hoping to build a self-sustaining recreational program to supplement their efforts to improve general public health.  The whole point of these enterprises, Jim says, is to improve the lives and families in the community by addressing health, education and economic issues.

Follow Jim's adventure in Ecuador through this blog. To learn more about Shoulder to Shoulder visit:  http://www.shouldertoshoulderky.org/.
 

Inline Images: 
Jim Busher
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