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UK Reflects on Meaning of Juneteenth Ahead of 1st Academic Holiday

In January 1863, the Emancipation Proclamation was issued, declaring more than three million slaves living in the Confederate states to be free, unbeknownst to many of those enslaved. It was not until Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, more than two years later, on June 19, 1865, that the last enslaved U.S. populations were informed of the proclamation. Today, we celebrate that day and the liberation of the slaves. Known as Juneteenth, a blend of the words June and nineteenth, this day has been recognized by Black communities for decades, however, this year will mark the first year that UK will acknowledge Juneteenth as an academic holiday. 

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